U.S.A. Senate Bill 350

Senate Bill 350

(from The Malay Mail OnLine June 28, 2013)

“On Wednesday, the Senate approved a major border security amendment aimed at broadening Republican support for the bill.

It would spend US$46 billion (RM146.4 billion) in 10 years to place 20,000 more federal law enforcement agents at the US-Mexico border, finish construction of a 700-mile (1,125-km) fence on portions of the border and purchase high-tech surveillance equipment.

Regarding border security.  The people from this part of Mexico all cross at a place near Nogales Arizona.  It is at this same place for many many years.  When they are going to the United States they will call ahead to find out if the (illegal) crossing is open.  If it is not open, the would-be migrants then wait until it opens again, then they get on a bus to Mexico City, then another bus all the way to Nogales.  For a long time it cost one thousand five hundred dollars for the coyote, however in the past few years, the price has gone up to two thousand five hundred.   Frequently, this is paid in advance by the employer or by family members, but not always.   The wetbacks cross along some desert paths and are transported inside the highway checkpoints and then to Phoenix airport where they catch flights to their destinations.

To stop this flow of mexican migrants 40,000 federal officers would be superfluous since the illegal migrants are hardly flowing across the frontier as if it were a sieve.  Effectively, they all go to a few unofficially designated illegal crossing points in California, Arizona, and Texas.  If you put a skinny traffic cop with a tin whistle at each of these crossing points and it was made clear that the illegal crossing was no longer going to be allowed then hardly any Mexicans would ever go to the border to try to get across.  However if 40,000 federal officers are hired and the illegal crossings continue to operate in the way they always have, then, that would be purely a waste of money, and an out-and-out boondoggle. 

The Republican-controlled House Judiciary Committee is working on various immigration bills. This week it passed legislation requiring all US employers to use an electronic program known as E-Verify to ensure they are only hiring legally documented workers.”

Regarding electronic verification of employers hiring Mexican workers, well that would appear to be a solid step towards establishing the rule of law which is what the Republican Senators prominently laud.  There should be very careful oversight of the investigating authority since there exists a propensity for abuse that should be guarded in advance.

Republicans have argued that Americans do not support placing the 11 million on a pathway to citizenship, or “amnesty,” as they call it.

Regarding the so-called “amnesty”.  It pleases some to refer to the Mexican workers as “illegals” or “criminals”, still the grandparents of these men were coming to the United States to work since the nineteen-fifties if not earlier.  The magic number 11 millions is repeatedly cited.  I was tempted to write “…was obsessively cited”!

(the foregoing in BLUE is from The Malay Mail OnLine June 28, 2013)
BLACK is commentary of el buho2 July 2013

– See more at: http://www.themalaymailonline.com/world/article/us-senate-passes-sweeping-immigration-legislation#sthash.ruv8RsVz.dpuf

(from The Forum For Expatriot Management)

USA: Current Enforcement Tactics of New S.C. Immigration Law

The South Carolina Illegal Immigration Reform Act took effect on July 1, 2009 for private employers with 100 or more employees. All other private employers must be in compliance by July 1, 2010.

The Act prohibits employers in South Carolina from “knowingly or intentionally” employing unauthorized aliens and establishes steps that employers must take to verify the work status of new hires as of the effective date. Employers that violate the provisions of the law will face tough penalties in the form of monetary fines and possible suspension, even permanent revocation, of the ability to employ workers in South Carolina.

South Carolina Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation (LLR) is responsible for issuing regulations and enforcing the new law as it applies to private employers. LLR has yet to issue guidance or finalize regulations regarding implementation of the law; however, “proposed” regulations covering the “random” audit process and steps for administrative review are available on LLR’s website.

(the foregoing in MAROON is from The Forum For Expatriot Management)
BLACK is buho2 commentary.

The article goes on the examine the enforcement tactics of the state government agency empowered with enforcement of this labor law aimed at the employment of illegal alien workers and points out the kinds of issues that will emerge in future years, whether on a state-by-state, or on the federal level.